Culturally stepping backwards

img_2314I view the UK, my home country, from the short distance across the North Sea from my home in the Netherlands. Geographically it is a small distance and yet somehow it seems to be drifting slowly away, certainly in a cultural dimension.

Yesterday it was announced, in changes set in motion by former education secretary Michael Gove, that art history, as a so called ‘soft’ subject, was to be removed from the national A-level exam programme for eighteen year olds. It is not an announcement that is going to directly affect tens of thousands of teenagers, it is indeed a subject that is only chosen by relatively few students. But the numbers involved aren’t the reason being given for the scrapping of the subject. A spokeswoman for AQA, the exam board, was quoted as having said,

“Our number one priority is making sure every student gets the result they deserve – and the complex and specialist nature of the exams in this subject creates too many risks on that front. That’s why we’ve taken the difficult decision not to continue our work creating a new AS and A-level.”

It would seem that the priority is the grading of the exam is more important rather than the actual content of the programme itself. It is a perspective that those who work in education have heard often enough before. Babies and bath water seem immediately to spring to mind.

This is one more drop in the increasing filling bucket of news stories that reflect a shift in perspective and hardening of attitudes that is increasingly effecting the cultural fabric and riches in the UK.

There is irony here in the outrage shown in the destruction of world heritage sites and cultural history in Syria during the last few years, and yet we seem to be offering reduced perspectives for those who actually want to contribute to understanding why these high points of human creativity are actually important to us.

On a more contemporary note art history and a deep understanding of the cultural world is perhaps more important than ever. The modern world is increasingly one that is driven by a visual culture and art historical perspectives have an important part to play in developing a visual literacy that is needed to engage and understand.

For a more background on this backward step see:

Last art history A-level

Last art history A-level II

 

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6 thoughts on “Culturally stepping backwards

    • I did that about fifteen years ago Rosie…..and was able to keep the British one too. Is that still possible? I have to say that at the moment I don’t really close to hurrying back to the UK with a long term plan.

  1. What can I say? So sad, short sighted and culturally disastrous. And, only one gradual step towards culturally ignorant and visually illiterate generations. Hard mistake to correct.

  2. Typical of governments who see the arts as add-ons, especially drama and visual arts and art history! If art appreciation cd be taught along the lines of Alain de Botton and John Armstrong’s Art as Therapy perhaps pupis would see more relevance?

  3. Pingback: Avoiding a cultural backwards step | Peter Sansom

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