The things they didn’t mention during teacher training – No.2, sugar and its effect (or not) on children

I’m not a scientist, I’ve done no research into this area, but for me, the facts of sugar on the behavior of children could hardly have been more visibly seen than it was last week.
I was traveling on a school trip with a group of 115 twelve and thirteen year olds and eight colleagues on a five day trip from the Netherlands to Swindon in the UK by boat and bus. This meant two days of travel and three days of activities in England.

2E587A67-1423-471C-AF7E-4241CF91BE6A
Generally it was a successful week, not without its incidents, but everything we wanted to do has been successfully achieved. However a recurring discussion amongst the teachers team was around the amounts of sugar, sweets and soft drinks that the children had brought with them, purchased during our day out in Oxford and were consuming relentlessly every time that they returned to their rooms.
Children always are boisterous and excited on trips like these, it is a trip that we have done many times before and we are more than familiar with such behaviour. But this year seemed different, they were so hyper at times, pumped up almost tangibly by the sugary rush that many seemed to giving themselves throughout the day.
As I write this it seems almost naïve of us to allow them free reign with their sugar enriched diet. It does look sometimes like the inclusion of a large bag of sweets is an almost obligatory part of any Dutch school outing. Parents seem more than happy to facilitate this and we regularly see children arrive with a suitcase that has obviously been packed by a parent also being a suitcase that is overflowing with packets of sweets, biscuits and chocolate just to get them through the five days away!
Having got back home I have done a little research into scientific evidence of ‘sugar highs’. Surprisingly, although I could have found articles of support, the majority of the articles talk of ‘sugar highs’ and ‘sugar rushes’ being something of a myth. My evidence is very much of the anecdotal type, but it certainly felt like a pretty real thing last week. Yes, the kids were wound up by the general experience of being away, but somehow something more seemed to be going on!
For me and my colleagues a limit has been reached this week, absurd amounts of calories have been consumed with apparently resulting sugary kicks. We have agreed that the time has come to enlighten the parents on the problems we face when trying to calm and slow the children down at the end of the day at bed time. It may or may not help us in future, but there are of course numerous other extremely valid reasons for trying to reduce the intake of sugar in or young people.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s