Well-being and the arts (part two)

A couple of days ago I posted some thoughts on the significance of the arts and their general contribution towards our sense of well-being. I’ve had various pieces of feedback in response to it and I’d just like to share a couple that seem to connect so well.

blueart

Firstly, a quote from Brian Thorne, Emeritus Professor and Director of the Centre for Counselling Studies at the University of East Anglia in Norwich.

I count it essential that I visit the sea frequently, that I train my eye to observe the intricate design of trees and plants, and that I make friends with animals.  What is more, I am horrified if I discover I have let a whole week pass without having read a poem, listened to music, visited a beautiful building or feasted my eyes on a work of art.  I know that I need to do these if I am to cultivate a sense of deep connectedness to all that is, and, more importantly, if I am to retain a sense of awe and wonder at the marvels of creation, whether natural or human.

Secondly, a short film that relates more specifically to my work to encourage pupils to choose creative subjects to study whilst at school. The Tate Gallery in London has produced a film that addresses many of the points I try to make, plus a few more.

A couple of days ago I posted some thoughts on the significance of the arts and their general contribution towards our sense of well-being. I’ve had various pieces of feedback in response to it and I’d just like to share a couple that seem to connect so well.

Firstly, a quote from Brian Thorne, Emeritus Professor and Director of the Centre for Counselling Studies at the University of East Anglia in Norwich.

I count it essential that I visit the sea frequently, that I train my eye to observe the intricate design of trees and plants, and that I make friends with animals.  What is more, I am horrified if I discover I have let a whole week pass without having read a poem, listened to music, visited a beautiful building or feasted my eyes on a work of art.  I know that I need to do these if I am to cultivate a sense of deep connectedness to all that is, and, more importantly, if I am to retain a sense of awe and wonder at the marvels of creation, whether natural or human.

Secondly, a short film that relates more specifically to my work to encourage pupils to choose creative subjects to study whilst at school. The Tate Gallery in London has produced a film that addresses many of the points I try to make, plus a few more.

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Brian Eno – The BBC John Peel Lecture

Why do we make art?

What is the function of art?

….and how do hairstyles and a whole load of other things fit into these discussions.

If you didn’t hear it last week or haven’t come across it since, Eno’s calm and eloquent promotion (because it certainly isn’t a defence) of the significance of the arts makes for engaging listening. The forty-five minute presentation on how and why art and culture in its broadest sense is so important to us and why it shouldn’t be underestimated in its relevance touches on a multitude of references. Eno looks ahead towards the future and possible changes ahead of us raises so many points for discussion.

eno

Art offers an environment to consider issues and subjects that we may not otherwise come to. But above all, art in all its forms is about engagement with one another and engagement ourselves. If you have a long train journey coming, a large pile of washing up to do or simply time for a glass of wine take the time to listen.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p033smwp#play